English Department Survey 2018-2019 (for grade 10s and 11s)

 

Next year’s Grade 11 Survey

 

Next year’s Grade 12 Survey

 

 

English Language Arts 11 Options

 

Composition 11

Composition 11 is designed to support students as they refine, clarify, and adjust their written communication through practice and revision. Students will read and study compositions by other writers and be exposed to a variety of styles as models for the development of their writing. The course provides opportunities for students to, with increasing independence, study, create, and write original and authentic pieces for a range of purposes and real-world audiences.

The following are possible areas of focus within Composition 11:

 

  • narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive, and opinion pieces
  • planning, drafting, and editing processes
  • writing for specific audiences and specific disciplines
  • how to cite sources, consider the credibility of evidence, and evaluate the quality and reliability of the source

 

Creative Writing 11

Creative Writing 11 is designed for students who are interested in developing confidence and refining their writing skills through self-expression for various creative purposes. Students will collaborate and strengthen their skills through writing and design processes. Creative Writing 11 is grounded in the exploration and application of writing processes, inviting students to express themselves creatively as they reflect on, adjust, and extend their writing skills.

The following are possible areas of focus within Creative Writing 11:

 

  • short fiction and poetry – suggested content includes flash-fiction (micro-fiction, drabble, non-fiction, twitterature), graffiti, sub-genres
    (e.g., adventure, children’s literature, comic/graphic, fantasy, fan fiction, historical fiction, horror, sci-fi, dystopian, suspense, thriller, tragedy, romance), drama, script writing, poetry, authenticity versus sentimentality, literary devices and techniques, various forms, the relationship
    between form and function
  • creative non-fiction suggested content includes columns, features, articles, queries, captions, layout, reporting, interviews, reviews
    (fashion, movie), advertising, titles, bylines, sample readings
  • memoir – suggested content includes place-based writing, narrative, film memoir, sample readings
  •  

Literary Studies 11

Literary Studies 11 allows students to delve deeply into literature. Students can explore specific themes, periods, authors, or areas of the world through literary works (fiction and non-fiction) in a variety of media. Giving students the choice of a range of literary topics allows them to follow their passion and at the same time:

  • increase their literacy skills through close reading of appropriately challenging texts
  • enhance their development of the English Language Arts curricular competencies, both expressive and receptive
  • expand their development as educated global citizens
  • develop balance and broaden their understanding of themselves and the world
  • further develop higher-level thinking and learning skills

The following are possible areas of focus in Literary Studies 11:

 

  • canonical literature by era (Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, Romantic, Victorian, 20th century)
  • genre-specific studies (poetry, short stories, novels, drama, graphic novels, children’s literature)
  • world literature
  • diasporic literature
  • feminist literature
  • Canadian literature
  • First Peoples texts
  • specific author studies
  • specific topic, theme, or inquiry
  • literature by era (Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, Romantic, Victorian, 20th century)
  •  

New Media 11

New Media 11 is a program of studies designed to reflect the changing role of technology in today’s society and the increasing importance of digital media in communicating and exchanging ideas.. Coursework is aimed at providing students with a set of skills vital for success in an increasingly complex digital world by affording numerous opportunities to demonstrate understanding and communicate increasingly sophisticated ideas through a wide variety of digital and print media.

The following are possible focus areas in New Media 11:

 

  • media and film studies – suggested content/topics include the globalization of the media industry, influence of media on users’ perceptions,
    and documentaries in the age of digital media
  • journalism and publishing – suggested content/topics include the changing roles and structures within news organizations; and risks, challenges, and opportunities associated with professional journalism
  • digital communication – suggested content/topics include blogging, writing for the web, writing for social media, gaming, and podcasting

 

Spoken Language 11

Spoken Language 11 is designed to support students as they refine, clarify, and adjust their spoken communication through practice and revision. The course provides opportunities for students to, with increasing independence, study, create, write, and present original and authentic pieces for a range of purposes and real-world audiences. They will expand their competencies through processes of drafting, reflecting, and revising to build a body of work that demonstrates expanding breadth, depth, and evidence of spoken language genres for a range of situations. They will develop confidence in their abilities as they consolidate their spoken language skills.

The following are possible areas of focus in Spoken Language 11:

 

  • performance – suggested content/topics include spoken word/slam poetry, poetry recitation, oral storytelling, readers’ theatre,
    radio/podcasts/video posts
  • oral tradition – suggested content/topics include oratory, local story knowledge, oral history
  • professional applications – suggested content/topics include speech writing/presenting, proposals, interviewing, event facilitation, radio/podcasts/video posts (information items), voice-overs

 

 

English Language Arts 12 Options

Composition 12

Composition 12 is designed to support students in their refinement and pursuit of mastery of written communication. Students will read and study exemplary compositions by other writers and be exposed to a variety of styles as models for the development of their writing. The course provides opportunities for students, with increasing independence and self-sufficiency, to study, create, and write original and authentic pieces for a range of purposes and audiences using real-world applications with impact and effectiveness. They will develop their craft through processes of drafting, reflecting, and revising to build a body of publishable work that demonstrates breadth, depth, and evidence of sophisticated and specialized writing for a range of situations.

The following are possible areas of focus within Composition 12:

  • narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive, and opinion pieces, with attention to areas such as thesis development, structure, transitions,
    hooks and leads, persuasion, argumentation, and the study of a wide range of sample works
  • planning, drafting, and editing processes
  • writing for specific professional audiences and specific academic disciplines
  • how to cite sources, consider the credibility of evidence, and evaluate the quality and reliability of the source

Creative Writing 12

Creative Writing 12 is designed for students who are interested in creating a body of work reflective of a sophisticated breadth and depth of skill. The course provides students with opportunities to specialize and publish in real-world contexts. Students engage in the exploration of personal and cultural identities, memories, and stories, in a wide range of genres. Within a supportive community, students will collaborate and develop their skills through writing and design processes, celebrating successes. Students will refine their ability to write in complex, controlled styles with effectiveness and impact.

The following are possible areas of focus within Creative Writing 12:

  • fiction and poetry – suggested content includes flash fiction, graffiti, sub-genres (e.g., adventure, children’s literature, comic/graphic, fantasy,
    fan fiction, historical fiction, horror, sci-fi, dystopian, suspense, thriller, tragedy, romance), drama, script writing, poetry, authenticity versus sentimentality, literary devices and techniques, various forms, the relationship between form and function
  • creative non-fiction – suggested content includes columns, features, articles, queries, captions, layout, reporting, interviews, reviews
    (fashion, movie), advertising, titles, bylines, sample readings
  • memoir – suggested content includes place-based writing, narrative, film memoir, sample readings
  •  

English Studies 12

The required English Studies 12 course builds on and extends students’ previous learning experiences in ELA and EFP 10 and 11 courses. It is designed for all students and provides them with opportunities to

  • refine their ability to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and to achieve their personal and career goals
  • think critically and creatively about the uses of language
  • explore texts from a variety of sources, in multiple modes, and that reflect diverse worldviews
  • deepen their understanding of themselves and others in a changing world
  • gain insight into the diverse factors that shape identity
  • appreciate the importance of self-representation through text
  • contribute to Reconciliation by building greater understanding of the knowledge and perspectives of First Peoples
  • expand their understanding of what it means to be educated Canadian and global citizens

 

 

Literary Studies 12

Literary Studies 12 allows students to delve more deeply into literature through increasingly complex texts. Students can explore specific themes, periods, authors, or areas of the world through literary works (fiction and non-fiction) in a variety of media. Giving students the choice of a range of literary topics allows them to follow their passion and at the same time:

  • increase their literacy skills through close reading of appropriately challenging texts
  • enhance their development of the English Language Arts curricular competencies, both expressive and receptive
  • expand their development as educated global citizens
  • develop balance and broaden their understanding of themselves and the world
  • further refine higher-level thinking and learning skills

The following are possible areas of focus in Literary Studies 12:

  • genre-specific studies – poetry, short stories, novels, drama, graphic novels, children’s literature
  • world literature
  • diasporic literature
  • feminist literature
  • Canadian literature
  • First Peoples texts
  • specific author studies
  • topic, theme, or inquiry
  • canonical literature by era—Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, Romantic, Victorian, 20th century

New Media 12

New Media 12 is a program of studies designed to reflect the changing role of technology in today’s society and the increasing importance of digital media in communicating and exchanging ideas. This course is intended to allow students and educators the flexibility to develop an intensive program of study centred on students’ interests, needs, and abilities, while at the same time allowing for a range of local delivery methods. New Media 12 recognizes that digital literacy is an essential characteristic of the educated citizen. Coursework is aimed at providing students with a set of skills vital for success in an increasingly complex digital world by affording numerous opportunities to demonstrate understanding and communicate increasingly sophisticated ideas through a wide variety of digital and print media. Compared with New Media 11, New Media 12 features tasks and texts of greater complexity and sophistication. As well, the Grade 12 course extends the depth and breadth of topics and activities offered in New Media 11.

The following are possible focus areas in New Media 12:

  • media and film studies – suggested content/topics include the globalization of the media industry, influence of media on users’ perceptions, documentaries in the age of digital media
  • journalism and publishing – suggested content/topics include the changing roles and structures within news organizations; risks, challenges,
    and opportunities associated with professional journalism
  • digital communication – suggested content/topics include blogging, writing for the web, writing for social media, gaming, podcasting

Spoken Language 12

Spoken Language 12 is designed to support students in the refinement of spoken language forms. The course provides opportunities for students, with increasing independence and self-sufficiency, to study, create, write, and present original and authentic pieces for a range of purposes and audiences using real-world applications with impact and effectiveness. They will develop their craft through processes of drafting, reflecting, revising, and practising to build a body of publishable and/or performance-based work that demonstrates breadth, depth, and evidence of sophisticated and specialized spoken language pieces for a range of situations.

The following are possible areas of focus in Spoken Language 12:

  • performance – suggested content/topics include spoken word/slam poetry, poetry recitation, oral storytelling, readers’ theatre,
    radio/podcasts/video posts
  • oral tradition – suggested content/topics include oratory, local story knowledge, oral history
  • professional applications – suggested content/topics include speech writing/presenting, proposals, interviewing, event facilitation, radio/podcasts/video posts (information items), voice-overs

English Department Survey 2018-2019 (for grade 10s and 11s) Section Pages